THE LORD IS WITH YOU

Bible stories

Genesis 39

2 The LORD was with Joseph so that he prospered, and he lived in the house of his Egyptian master. 3 When his master saw that the LORD was with him and that the LORD gave him success in everything he did, 4 Joseph found favor in his eyes and became his attendant. Potiphar put him in charge of his household, and he entrusted to his care everything he owned. 5 From the time he put him in charge of his household and of all that he owned, the LORD blessed the household of the Egyptian because of Joseph. The blessing of the LORD was on everything Potiphar had, both in the house and in the field. 6 So Potiphar left everything he had in Joseph’s care; with Joseph in charge, he did not concern himself with anything except the food he ate.
Now Joseph was well-built and handsome, 7 and after a while his master’s wife took notice of Joseph and said, “Come to bed with me!”
8 But he refused. “With me in charge,” he told her, “my master does not concern himself with anything in the house; everything he owns he has entrusted to my care. 9 No one is greater in this house than I am. My master has withheld nothing from me except you, because you are his wife. How then could I do such a wicked thing and sin against God?” 10 And though she spoke to Joseph day after day, he refused to go to bed with her or even be with her.
11 One day he went into the house to attend to his duties, and none of the household servants was inside. 12 She caught him by his cloak and said, “Come to bed with me!” But he left his cloak in her hand and ran out of the house.
13 When she saw that he had left his cloak in her hand and had run out of the house, 14 she called her household servants. “Look,” she said to them, “this Hebrew has been brought to us to make sport of us! He came in here to sleep with me, but I screamed. 15 When he heard me scream for help, he left his cloak beside me and ran out of the house.”
16 She kept his cloak beside her until his master came home. 17 Then she told him this story: “That Hebrew slave you brought us came to me to make sport of me. 18 But as soon as I screamed for help, he left his cloak beside me and ran out of the house.”
19 When his master heard the story his wife told him, saying, “This is how your slave treated me,” he burned with anger. 20 Joseph’s master took him and put him in prison, the place where the king’s prisoners were confined.
But while Joseph was there in the prison, 21 the LORD was with him; he showed him kindness and granted him favor in the eyes of the prison warden. 22 So the warden put Joseph in charge of all those held in the prison, and he was made responsible for all that was done there. 23 The warden paid no attention to anything under Joseph’s care, because the LORD was with Joseph and gave him success in whatever he did.

 

 

 

We heard Jesus say today, “Take up your cross and follow me.” This is not an encouragement for Christians to build a heavy, wooden object and carry it all the time or find a nice pendant to hang on a chain around our necks.  This is also not Jesus’ way of telling you that you have to participate with him in the work of salvation.  It is not possible to help Jesus save you from hell.  There is nothing for us to do in the eternal life equation.  We are saved by God’s grace alone through faith in Jesus.  But that does not change what Jesus says to us today.  Following Jesus means you and I will have to carry something in life, and I think this Bible story helps us figure out what that is.

Joseph was a man who had already been through a lot.  The family he was born into was a little dysfunctional.  Joseph’s dad, Jacob, had 12 sons and one daughter…from the 4 different wives.  If you read through Genesis 30-38 you will see that this was not a good recipe for a family unit.  On top of that, Jacob was not always a good father.  He loved Joseph more than any of his children and everyone could see it, literally because Jacob made an ornate robe just for Joseph, almost as if to parade him around the house and the fields.  The brothers took notice and hated him for it.  The Bible says that they could not speak a kind word to him.

Things only got worse to the point where the brothers plotted ways to kill Joseph.  They didn’t go through with it, because they saw a caravan of merchants heading south. One of his brothers, Judah said,  “Why kill Joseph and cover it up?  Why not sell him, he is our brother after all, and make a little money on him?  We can still make it look like he is dead.”  So that’s what they did; they sold their brother and made everyone else believe he was dead.

That’s where we pick things up in Genesis 39.  Joseph is now a slave in Egypt, sold to Potiphar, the captain of Pharaoh’s guard.  And then we read this little line, “The Lord was with Joseph…”  Doesn’t this detail seem out of place to you?  Most people tend to think that bad things happen when people turn toward evil.  There is some wiring in the human brain that see things as cause and effect, something bad happens because someone was doing something bad.  Even spiritually, we might think, “Well, Joseph had it coming because he was getting too full of himself, and God had to put him in his place.”  But that’s not the case here.  All of these things happen to Joseph while the Lord was with him, watching over him, protecting him, loving him.

It seemed to be taking a turn for the better.  Joseph was a slave, but he wasn’t brutalized.  He was put in charge of the house.  Joseph was responsible for everything Potiphar had.  But it all comes crashing down, again. Potiphar’s wife comes into the picture with an offer, “Come to bed with me.”  Joseph is an honorable man and refuses.  But the reason is not because he didn’t want to have sex with her – someone else, maybe, but just not her – or because she was another man’s wife or because he was afraid of what Potiphar would do.

No, listen to his reason.  “How then could I do such a wicked thing and sin against God?”  Joseph sees this is a spiritual issue.  It is wrong because God says it is wrong.  God says certain things are sinful.  Plain and simple, we don’t get to decide what’s right and wrong.  Joseph does a good job of seeing this from a faith standpoint.   Believers listen to the Lord and follow him earnestly, faithfully, carefully.  Believers should not listen to the Lord and then grumble about following him.  Believers should not choose for themselves what to follow.  Believers should not get lazy about listening to the Lord when it seems old-fashioned or strict.  Believers should not grow careless and wander off.  That’s how believers end up falling away from Jesus.  It’s their own fault, not God’s.

Maybe the way Joseph reacts to this temptation will turn things around for him?  Maybe this is when the Lord will reward him?  But when he refuses, she doesn’t back down.  She continued to pressure him day after day.  Then, she actually got a hold of him, so Joseph had to leave his shirt behind and run out of there.  But that’s not the story that Potiphar gets.  No, he gets the version where Joseph is the immoral and abusive one.

Now, we could stop here to talk about sexual harassment and abuse in the workplace or at home, about the MeToo movement, about false allegations, about all this kind of stuff that comes up in our oversexualized society.  I don’t want to ignore this topic or lead anyone to think that this type of stuff is off limits. We have to talk about these kinds of things.  We have to listen to what God says. We have to be filled with love and compassion.  We have to be willing to listen and help whenever possible.

But for our purposes today, I want you just to consider Joseph’s reaction. He didn’t do anything wrong and is falsely accused, but when Potiphar gets a different story from his wife, what does Joseph do? It’s right there in verse…verse…verse… Actually, there is no reaction from Joseph recorded.  No press conference, no hiring of a lawyer, no plea for the other slaves, who all worked for Joseph, to speak up, nothing like that.  And I get it, he’s a slave, what can he do?  But still!  He just goes to prison.  For never complaining once about all these horrible circumstances, for being a good and honest slave, for being honorable in the face of temptation, for putting God first, Joseph’s suffering only gets worse.

And strangely enough what does verse 21 tell us?  “The Lord was with him…”  How come the all-powerful God didn’t step in?  If God is so loving and kind, why would Joseph have to endure all this?  When is enough, enough?  Aren’t those some of questions that a Bible story like this raises?  Aren’t those some of the questions you hear or ask from time to time?  I’ve been in the hospital, I’ve sat in my office, I’ve been at a cookout or a ballgame and talked to people who have these kinds of questions.

And the answer comes back to the cross Jesus is talking about.  A cross is not meant to be enjoyable.  It was a terrorizing instrument of death. The cross is pain.  The cross is persecution.  The cross is all the hardships you endure because you believe in Jesus.  Every Christian has a cross to carry.  It’s not an option.  Plain and simple, the cross has to be part of the life of Jesus’ followers.   This is not because God is unkind, but he knows there is something better for us than what this world has to offer.

The cross of suffering and persecution forces us to see that this world the way it really is. This is the place that is ravaged by sin.  This is the place where sin dooms people to eternal death in hell.  No fancy ornate robe like the one Jacob gave Joseph can cover my sin.  No job where I’m put in charge of everything can pay for my sins.  This is the place where suffering happens, not because God doesn’t care or doesn’t love you, but because sin is a destroyer.

Just think of what sin did to Jesus.  He suffered more than being sold into slavery.  He was sold for thirty pieces of silver into death.  He suffered more than imprisonment because of false accusations.  He was crucified.  That is the punishment for sin.  My sin and yours earn and deserve death.  But God stepped in for you.  Jesus paid the price so that we would not suffer what we deserve.  Jesus gave his life so that we could have life with him in heaven, where there is not suffering, no pain, no persecution.

Heaven is the home for God’s people, not this world. So, suffering the cross of persecution and hardship here forces us to keep our eyes where they need to be, on the one who saves us from suffering, on the spiritual and eternal blessings that are more profound, on the home that was purchased for us by the suffering and death of Jesus.  

If you aren’t willing to take up this cross, if you want everything in your life to be easy, if you want it my way or it’s the highway, if you want to avoid the questions, if you don’t want to deal with the pain, then how can you be a disciple of Jesus?  How can you bear the name of the one who died and rose to save you?  You are trying to save yourself from hardship and suffering, and only the Lord can do that.  You are trying to save yourself from what the Lord intends to be a spiritual and eternal benefit for you.  You are trying to save your life on earth, when the Lord wants you to be in heaven with him.  How could that possibly be what a child of God does? 

Do you know what the Lord accomplished through Joseph’s suffering?  He went to prison for more than two years, until the Pharaoh needed someone to interpret his dreams.  It just so happened there was a Hebrew slave in prison who had been given that gift from God.  God raised Joseph up from the suffering to be second in command of all Egypt.  God used Joseph to save the sons of Israel from a famine.  God used Joseph to be a beautiful example to his brothers of forgiveness and love.  God, then, went on to rescue Israel from Egypt and restore them in the Promised Land.  God kept his promise to deliver his people and save the world when he sent his own Son to take our suffering away for eternity.  That’s why this Bible story about Joseph keeps saying, “The Lord was with him…”  Despite the cross of suffering and hardships, Joseph was not alone.

When suffering is yours to endure, when persecution is the cross you must carry, the Lord is with you like he was with Joseph.  Followers of Jesus may lose things in this life, maybe it’s comfort, maybe friends or family, maybe a job, maybe health, or maybe even this life on earth is taken away, but Christ is with you.  And so your life is saved for eternity through his cross.  And that’s what matters.  That’s what we focus on.

I had the privilege keeping the focus on Jesus as I visited a couple of our members in the hospital this Friday.  I’ll conclude with the same words of God that I shared with them, words that give the encouragement we need as we carry our crosses.  From 2 Corinthians 4: 16 Therefore we do not lose heart. Though outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly we are being renewed day by day. 17 For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all. 18 So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.

Brothers and sisters, God bless you as you take up your cross and follow Jesus. Amen.

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SPEEDBUMPS

2.25.18 Lent

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Mark 8:31-38

31 He then began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests and the teachers of the law, and that he must be killed and after three days rise again. 32 He spoke plainly about this, and Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him.
33 But when Jesus turned and looked at his disciples, he rebuked Peter. “Get behind me, Satan!” he said. “You do not have in mind the concerns of God, but merely human concerns.”
34 Then he called the crowd to him along with his disciples and said: “Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. 35 For whoever wants to save their life will lose it, but whoever loses their life for me and for the gospel will save it. 36 What good is it for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul? 37 Or what can anyone give in exchange for their soul? 38 If anyone is ashamed of me and my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, the Son of Man will be ashamed of them when he comes in his Father’s glory with the holy angels.”

 

Last week, Jesus showed us how he never needed to turnaround from sin, because he fought off every temptation of Satan.   We do need the turnaround, the repentance, because sin does find its way into our life every day.  But that turnaround from sin does not happen by putting the focus on me and my work.  Instead, repentance flows from faith in Christ and is focused on Christ’s love and forgiveness.

That doesn’t mean that the road will get easier when you turnaround from sin.  Faith in Jesus does  not mean a nice earthly existence.  In fact, God’s Word leads us in faith to turn around from sin on a regular basis and living in that new direction means there will be more opportunities for difficulties.

It’s kind of like the difference between the interstate and county highways.  The interstate is the road that is nice.  It’s fast, it’s smooth (for the most part), it’s accessible, it provides everything you could want.  Tons and tons of people take the interstate for those reasons.  But the backroads, aren’t as nice.  You can’t go as fast.  There are not as many nice stops and amenities along the way.  The road can get twisty and turny and bumpy and lumpy.   There are even stop signs and those rumble strips along the way.

That’s the difference between the road to destruction and the road to heaven.  Ironically, the road to destruction is so nice, and it is preferred for its ease and convenience. The road to heaven is tough and ugly.  It gets bumpy, painful even.

Just listen again to what Jesus was teaching his disciples.  “The Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests and teachers of the law, and he must be killed…”  That was the road he chose for you.  Jesus was telling his disciples that he didn’t come here to make our life on earth easier.  He didn’t come here to make men and women more capable of turning this world around.  He came here to fulfill everything God has said about the Messiah. He came here to suffer and die for sins.

But the end result is far greater than anything our suffering or pain could ever produce.  Jesus finishes by saying, “and after three days rise again.”  All the suffering he would endure as he followed this road to our redemption,  all of the excruciating pain he would be forced to  undergo, and all of the heartache he would have from knowing the separation sin creates between God, it was all worth it.  His road to winning our redemption was never going to end in a grave.  This is the only way for us to have forgiveness and life in heaven.

Inevitably, when people hear about suffering and pain, we want to avoid it.  Even if there is good news at the end, it kind of depends on what the good news is.  Think of the pain and sacrifice that Olympians go through.  Depending on the sport they train for hours a day, for weeks, months, and years to get to the top level.  In order to get to that level, they give up time, they give up some relationships, they give up some enjoyment.  To a lot of people that doesn’t seem worth it.  Why would you do that to yourself?  But at the end of it you might give yourself and your team a chance to win a gold medal.  For some that is the good news that gets them through the sacrifices.

But you know what happens when you have to wait for the good news.  You know what happens when any kind of hardship, a rough patch, or some personal sacrifices come up before you reach the goal?  We get near-sighted and lazy.  The jostles and the bumps get annoying.  The pain and suffering get frustrating.  The persecutions make us lose sight of what’s at the end.

That’s where Peter got stuck.  He didn’t want to see Jesus suffer and die.  He wanted the glory and power of God.  He wanted the good life, the restored nation of Israel, the earthly peace, and all the great miracles.  He wanted life to be good.  I mean, if you are following the Son of God, shouldn’t life be great all the time?

I think we understand where Peter is coming from.  We want to avoid the suffering and pain, too.  We rebuke the idea that suffering is necessary for Jesus and for us.  We look for the nice, smooth, wide, and fast road.   How many people want the speedbumps that jostle you and slow you down?  Who wants to be twisted and turned?  Who wants to be removed from the nice amenities and easy conveniences?  Who wants to deal with sacrifices?

We get caught looking for so many blessings that any kind of suffering, or speedbump, knocks us off track.  How easy is it to think that if God is watching over me, then nothing bad should happen?  “My life on earth should be better if God is on my side,” we say.  “I shouldn’t have any speedbumps.  It should be smooth sailing now and in forever in heaven.”

But then pain comes.  Loved ones die.  Finances get tight. Things get tough.  Relationships are tested.    People question your faith.  “The bible says what about marriage?  About respecting government and leaders?  About your money?  About your priorities?  About putting others’ needs before your own?” You start to wonder what’s up.  The jostles and hardships can make us sound like Peter. “No, Lord!  This can’t happen to me.  I need my life to be easier and better for me.”

To that notion that my life needs to be easier and less bumpy, Jesus doesn’t just say, “Well, hang in there.” When we start thinking too much about how we don’t want the speedbumps, these sufferings and persecutions, Jesus  says this: “Get behind me, Satan! You do not have in mind the concerns of God, but merely human concerns.”  Jesus says, “If you do not have the things of God in your mind, then there is only one other option.”  That easy way without pain, without persecution, without any speedbumps is the devil’s doing.  It makes people focus on “merely human concerns,” or to put in another way, the things that are not God’s.  And how well do you think the things that are not of God can help you have a life with him?

Jesus went the road of suffering and persecution and pain because that was God’s way to save us.  Jesus had to suffer for sin.  He didn’t have to suffer just to experience the frailty of the human existence.  He had to suffer because that is what sin deserves.

We try so hard to avoid the speedbumps in life, because they are jolting and annoying.  But that is what sinners will always have to deal with because that is life with sin.  God wants us to have the speedbumps.  He wants us to deny ourselves what so many people would call basic human needs. He wants us to follow Jesus even when there are difficulties and persecutions.

But that is not suffering for sin.  God’s punishment went on Jesus instead of you.  Jesus is the one who died for sins.  The Bible often refers to the kinds of crosses we carry as “light and momentary.”  Jesus carried the eternal weight of guilt on his shoulders, so that we would never know what that feels like. Instead, we have these little speedbumps.  We have the denial of serving our self with the pleasures and desires of this world.  We have the cross of suffering and persecution to sharpen our focus on what God has already done for us in Christ and what he will do for us in heaven.  We have the blessed joy of following a Savior who loved us so much that he took our punishment and death, so that we could have life with him.

That’s why these speedbumps are so great for us.  The get us to slow down.  They might jolt you.  They might isolate you. They might force you to giving up the way you want to go.  But that’s good.  Because then we realize that we need help, we need strength, we need comfort that the world cannot give, we need saving from the pain, we need a place where these difficulties don’t exist, a place where sin cannot get to us.

Jesus walked the tough, grueling road to provide redemption for us.  His suffering has produced the eternal reward that far outweighs any of the hardships we face on this earth.  His death provides the life that is never taken away, a life that is never disappointing.

Jesus says, “Whoever wants to save his life, will lose it.”  If you want to get rid of your pain and suffering in this world so that you can have a great life with all sorts of worldly conveniences, then you won’t have a life with Jesus.  But Jesus says, “Whoever loses his life for me and the gospel will save it.”  When we follow Jesus in faith the world will say we lose certain things.  Maybe the next time you can let loose and get a little rowdy will be lost.  Maybe the guy, who is so great in so many ways except for his stubborn refusal to listen about your faith in Jesus, will have to be lost.  Maybe the promotion will be lost because you are not willing to stomp on others.  Maybe friends will be lost.  Maybe the focus on all the possessions and hobbies and stuff will be lost.

It might seem like you are denying somethings that would be so nice to have.  It might seem that we miss out.  It might seem like people are looking down on you and making you feel worthless.  But there is one looking down who is not ashamed.  He is glad to call you ‘brother’ or ‘sister.’  He is glad to speak in glowing terms to the Father in heaven about you.  He is glad to prepare a place in his home for you.

These speedbumps are necessary in life.  We need them to slow us down and get our attention where it needs to be.  Jesus is the only one who can save our life.  Following him might get difficult, but he has overcome every one of our light and momentary hardships with an eternal victory that will not disappoint us.  So slow down and enjoy his road, speedbumps and all.  God grant it.  Amen.

DISCIPLESHIP TAKES A TOLL

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25 Large crowds were traveling with Jesus, and turning to them he said: 26 “If anyone comes to me and does not hate his father and mother, his wife and children, his brothers and sisters—yes, even his own life—he cannot be my disciple. 27 And anyone who does not carry his cross and follow me cannot be my disciple.
28 “Suppose one of you wants to build a tower. Will he not first sit down and estimate the cost to see if he has enough money to complete it? 29 For if he lays the foundation and is not able to finish it, everyone who sees it will ridicule him, 30 saying, ‘This fellow began to build and was not able to finish.’
31 “Or suppose a king is about to go to war against another king. Will he not first sit down and consider whether he is able with ten thousand men to oppose the one coming against him with twenty thousand? 32 If he is not able, he will send a delegation while the other is still a long way off and will ask for terms of peace. 33 In the same way, any of you who does not give up everything he has cannot be my disciple.

 

Tim Tebow’s in the news again.   It’s not because he’s praying in public. It’s not because he’s trying to make it in the NFL again. It’s because he wants to make it in baseball.  Yeah, you heard right.  The former Heisman Trophy winner, the former college football national champion, who couldn’t get the job done on Sundays is now all in for a different career.  He hasn’t played in a real baseball game since high school.  He’s hoping some team will give him a shot in the minors.  Most prospects and draft picks are 18, 19, maybe 23; Tim Tebow is 29.  Most ball players and scouts talk about the daily routine and grind. In the minors, that means buses, hotels, eating out, distance from family and friends. They talk about keeping your mechanics of a swing or a throw over the long hall.  If you want to be good you need to know how to handle these things.  Tim Tebow just picked up at bat and got serious this past May after 11 years off.  Most people think he’s in la-la-land. Some think he’s got a shot, but it’s a looooong shot.  It’s going to take unwavering determination and total dedication and devotion.  You could say it is going to really cost him if he wants to make it.

In this Warning series Jesus has been warning us of spiritual dangers.  These warnings help us and encourage us to be ready and alert in faith.  They help us the same way the long list of warnings are motivating Tim Tebow. Warning 1) His Word is not supposed to create a utopia here on earth.  His Word will cause some divisions and those divisions might hit close to home, but the truth will always set us free from sin and bring us the eternal peace and unity. Warning 2) The door to heaven is narrow.  There is only one way to heaven and his name is Jesus.  Believe it or leave it. Warning 3) Be humble in this life.  You can’t puff yourself up with pride because you have nothing to be proud about except Jesus.  His humility saved us so that is how we will be exalted on the Last Day.

Now today is the fourth warning and Jesus wants you to know the toll of discipleship.  Is it like Tim Tebow chasing a lofty dream?  Does it take unwavering determination and the highest effort?  Jesus wants to help us figure that out in this last warning in the series.

We hear that large crowds were following Jesus at this time. We’re still in this same timeframe of less than a year before makes his last entrance into Jerusalem.  And tons of people were interested in Jesus.  Many were following the great teacher and miracle worker.  Many others were intrigued by the popular and polarizing fanatic.  Some were following God’s Messiah, the Savior of the world.

Which category are you in?  Duh! Of course that third group!  I’d sure hope so.  Being in those first two groups doesn’t do much.  It would be like following a political candidate, an athlete, or some motivational religious speaker every day online.  What does that really do for your life, give you something to talk about when you’re out getting coffee?  Jesus wants us to know that following him like that is doing nothing for you.  It’s the same as if you weren’t following him at all.  He doesn’t want us in either one of those groups.

That’s why he turns to the crowds and says, “If anyone comes to me and does not hate his father and mother, his wife and children, his brothers and sisters—yes, even his own life—he cannot be my disciple.”  Wait a minute!  That doesn’t even sound Christian.  The Bible says love your enemies. How could a follower of Jesus do that?  Well, Jesus is using a hyperbole.  It’s a comparison to draw attention and prove his point that discipleship is not easy.  Jesus is telling us that nothing can compare to him.  The parents, who took care of you and nurtured you, the spouse, who is your supportive rock, the children, whose smiles, hugs, and laughter bring so much joy into your life… love Jesus more than all of them.  Jesus needs to be the first, the supreme, the most important – not just one day a week – every day of your life.

So, if your brother says, “I know God doesn’t approve of the way I live my life, but I’d like you to stop reminding me about it.”  The thought of not sharing God’s law and gospel with him makes your insides turn.  Your child says, “Daddy, Daddy, can I please play soccer. Pretty please.  My friends are playing and it’s going to be so much fun.”  But the league games are Sunday. The thought of sitting on the sidelines watching your kid on the soccer field rather than being in worship with your kid makes you nauseous.  Your spouse says, “I appreciate your willingness to serve and the gifts you are giving to church, but it’s getting a little bit much don’t you think?”  Your response as a disciple of Christ is, “I love you, dear.  I will do anything for you.  But if you ever ask me to choose between Jesus and you, you won’t like my answer.”  That’s how serious Jesus is.  “But my kids need me and my spouse is everything to me.  Jesus, you are right up there with them, but come on! It’s my family.  They are with me every day, all day.”  Jesus doesn’t say, “Well, ok.  You can be a second tier disciple.  You won’t be a Peter, James, or John, but you can still tag along.”  No!  He says, “If you don’t love me more – I’ll even say this very clearly with a metaphoric hyperbole, if you don’t hate them – you cannot be my disciple.  It’s my way or the highway.”

What group are you in?  Are you the follower of the miracle worker?  Jesus provides what you want sometimes and the rest is up to you.  Are you following Jesus like someone on Twitter or Facebook, like a political candidate or an athlete?  He’s popular and you want to know about him so that you can chat with your friends.  Or are you willing to put everyone in a lower position so that Jesus can be #1 all the time?

Discipleship is not easy.  It takes a toll.  The way Jesus sounds, it takes more to be his disciple than it does for Tim Tebow to make it as a baseball player. You need determination like you’ve never had before.  But Jesus isn’t done, yet.  He talks about how you think and feel towards others, but he also has something to say about how your life will be very personally affected. Can you handle this?   “And anyone who does not carry his cross and follow me cannot be my disciple.”

And what is this cross?  Do we have to carry a huge chunk of wood around with us wherever we go?  Is a cross some form of punishment because we are sinful?  No.  Simply speaking a cross is something that brings pain and hardship into your life of faith.  Think of Joseph or Job from the Old Testament. Think Paul in the New.  These men weren’t being punished.  They were being trained and tested. This cross is never the same for every disciple.  It’s heavier for some.  It’s last longer for some.  But the purpose of our crosses is to get the focus off of me and directed to Jesus, the only Savior from pain and suffering.

Normally, a cross was for those who deserved death.  Criminals were forced to carry the cross that would kill them.  But Jesus says that his disciple will carry it willingly.  It’s not optional.  This cross of pain and hardship that each disciple has must be carried. If you are not willing, one of those other groups will not work and you can’t slide down a scale of discipleship that is a little less serious.  Jesus simply says you are not his disciple.

Some may go along with the relationship thing.  Yes, we love Jesus above our family.  But when Jesus says that a disciple must face pain and struggle, must make some huge sacrifices… then people start to leave.  Because you can look around and see plenty of people that are not struggling.  You can find plenty of friends and families that are healthier, happier, and more successful.  And that sounds a lot better than being crushed under a heavy load.

And Jesus isn’t done; there’s one more thing.  Any of you who does not give up everything he has cannot be my disciple.  Whatever you have that gets in the way of following Jesus, wherever you look to find your worth, it has to be tossed aside, because it cannot compare to Jesus.

And this is not just a one-time thing.  Discipleship is never done.  For Tim Tebow, this newest journey won’t last, just like his college career ended and his NFL career ended, his baseball hopes will end.  But discipleship doesn’t have an end date during your life. Throughout this whole section Jesus is using the present tense.  That means whatever is current, right now in your life.  And that changes from year to year, even from day to day.  Before you had a spouse there was no need to lower that relationship beneath Jesus.  Before you had a career there was no need to put that in its proper place behind Jesus.  And so on.  Every day as a disciple is a day to put relationships in their proper place below Jesus.  Every day you have to take up the struggle.  Every day you have to give up whatever creeps up to take Jesus’ place.  It never ends.  You will never say, “I have carried my cross of sickness, sorrow, emotional pain, or persecutions and now I don’t have to do that anymore. I’m done with my cross.”  Jesus says if you are going to be his disciple, it never stops.  Every day there will be a toll.  Every day will be a battle.

Is it worth it?  That’s kind of the real question here.  Jesus uses two examples to explain that point.  A person wanting to build something great has to plan it out and consider all the costs and the sacrifices so that they can finish the project.  Someone who didn’t think it through and cannot finish the project is laughed at.  A king going to battle against another king considers if he can carry out his plan and come out victorious.  If he can then the battle ensues.  If he cannot he sends up the white flag and negotiates for peace.

A follower listening to Jesus say these kinds of things will inevitably ask, “Is it really worth it?”  I don’t know too many people who look over this section about discipleship and think to themselves, “Sounds great!  Sign me up!”  I mean this is tough.  This is not for the faint-hearted.  Discipleship with Jesus is not going to be easy, ever.  Who is up for this?

But there’s one final thing that jumps out of this section.  It’s not in the words, but you find it in the One speaking the words.  He’s known as Word made flesh, Jesus Christ.  Did you notice how every one of these things is exactly what Jesus has done?  In his earthly life he put his heavenly Father first all the time.  He carried his cross willingly.  He considered the high cost and still followed the plan to the T.  He left everything and everyone behind so that he would be the perfect Savior and substitute for us.

Just think, when he came down from heaven and was born in a barn, God was first.  As he submitted himself to his earthly parents, God was first.  When he was 12 in the temple, God was first.  As he began his ministry by being baptized by John, God was first.  Every day of his ministry carried out the will of God.  At one point Mary and his family showed up where Jesus was wanting to talk with him, but Jesus put God’s work first.  His love for God was always more than his love for his family.  That doesn’t mean he disowned his family or harbored ill will towards them at any time.

And then Jesus was willing to carry his cross.  He didn’t deserve that torture, but he carried it for us.  And when it came time to die, he didn’t back off but he went the whole way, even saying farewell to his earthly mother. Jesus didn’t let anything stop him.  He considered the high cost of your forgiveness. He saw the war with the devil, the world, and each of our sinful natures that only one could fight, and so Jesus went to war and won our victory.

Why did Jesus do it?  You were worth it to him. Jesus loved you and could not bear the thought of you flounder away thinking that your eternity, your salvation in heaven, was based on your discipleship.  It’s not.  Discipleship and salvation are two different things.  Never once in this section does Jesus say that discipleship will save you.  Discipleship can’t save you, because discipleship is all about your crosses and your sacrifices.  If your discipleship saved you then how would you ever know that you had done enough?  How would you ever know if the sacrifices you make would atone for all your sins?  You would go through this life with no peace and no joy.

But your salvation is no dependent on your crosses and your sacrifices.  Your salvation depends on Jesus’ cross and his sacrifice.  He does not let you down.  He didn’t skimp on anything for you.  He made every sacrifice.  He took the full weight of the cross.  He died for your sins and rose to prove that his work defeated all your enemies.  Jesus saves you.

No one can love you more than Christ Jesus. No one can love your spouse, your parents, and your kids more than Christ Jesus.  You know that’s true because as much as you care for them, you could never take away their sins.  You could never give them what Jesus has.

Jesus’ love, his willing sacrifice, is what changes the way we think of discipleship.  Instead of thinking that we have to make all sorts of unfair sacrifices in order to live with Jesus forever, we get to make these sacrifices so that we can understand his love for us more, so that we can have a deeper relationship with our eternal Savior, and so that we can love and serve those around us more.  We get to be disciples even though we could never live up to these requirements because Jesus met every one of them perfectly for us.

Doesn’t that make you want to live for him?  Doesn’t that make discipleship a joy and not a burden?  For Tim Tebow, his journey to the MLB is going to be grueling and it may not even pan out.  It’s going to take a heavy toll on his life.  It’s going to cost him.  And for what?  A few years of maybe making it to the big time and proving that he can hack it as a professional athlete.   But for him it’s worth it.  But you know, there’s something else about Tim Tebow.  He’s a follower of Jesus.  So, he understands that the biggest sacrifice was already made.  Jesus died for his sins….and yours and mine and the sins of the whole world.  He did that so you would never think that you have to earn his love by following him like this.  Jesus paid for you.  He washed you and purified you.  He made you God’s own child.  Now, he says, “Be my disciples.”  And no matter what the cost or the toll, it’s worth it for a Savior who loves you that much.

Amen.