ONLY CHRIST MAKES A CHRISTIAN HOME

Week 8 – 7.30.17

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Colossians 3:12-21

12 Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience. 13 Bear with each other and forgive one another if any of you has a grievance against someone. Forgive as the Lord forgave you. 14 And over all these virtues put on love, which binds them all together in perfect unity.
15 Let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, since as members of one body you were called to peace. And be thankful. 16 Let the message of Christ dwell among you richly as you teach and admonish one another with all wisdom through psalms, hymns, and songs from the Spirit, singing to God with gratitude in your hearts. 17 And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.
18 Wives, submit yourselves to your husbands, as is fitting in the Lord.
19 Husbands, love your wives and do not be harsh with them.
20 Children, obey your parents in everything, for this pleases the Lord.
21 Fathers, do not embitter your children, or they will become discouraged.

 

 

“It is so good to be home.”  Have you said it before?  I’m sure.  I said it when we got back from our trips earlier this July.  It doesn’t mean you hate vacation.  It’s just that you are happy to be done living out of a suitcase, sleeping in a hotel or tent, driving or flying from place to place, spending more money than normal, or eating too much.  You are happy to be back in your normal routine, your own bed, your own kitchen, and of course for the guys, our own couches and clickers.

Now, today we are not talking about the advantages and disadvantages of being at your house vs. being on vacation, but I think that comparison helps us get into the topic of a Christian home.  Because where does Christ need to be in a Christian home?  Should he be the visitor, the vacationer… or should he be living among your family and dwelling in you?  Should he have a continuous place in your home?

The Lord God himself makes the answer very clear in these words before us this morning: “Let the Word  of Christ dwell in you richly as you teach and admonish one another with all wisdom through psalms, hymns, and songs from the Spirit, singing to God with gratitude in your hearts. And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.”

Jesus needs a dwelling place, not a vacation spot.  He wants to be in your conversations and what you study and learn.  He wants to be the reason and the motivation for everything you do and say.  He doesn’t want to be relegated to visiting hours a couple days of the month or year.  He doesn’t want to have a quick mention before you eat.

So, let me ask you, where is Jesus in your home?  Is he the vacationer?  Or does he have a dwelling place there?  You don’t have to wonder about God’s willingness to be in your life and home.  When you were washed in baptism, he was taking up residence in your heart.  And your Lord wants nothing more than to stay there forever.  Since God loved you that much, since he has brought you into the family, what is your response?  How are you keeping the Lord present in your home? What does your side of that relationship look like?

There is a pretty easy way to tell.  Listen to what God says. “Let the Word of Christ dwell in you richly,” “ whatever you do, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus,” and  “give thanks to God the Father through him.”  Christ is dwelling in your home – not just visiting or vacationing – when his Word is in regular use.  Christ is dwelling in your home when you carry out your responsibilities with a focus on his purpose and for his glory.  Christ is dwelling in your home when prayers are not just a bunch of requests, but also thanksgiving for all that he has done for you and all the blessings God has given to you.  Christ is dwelling in your home when you follow what he says about family life and roles.

Jesus did not die to be your guest now and then.  He paid the price to take all your sins away and to bring you back into the family of God forever.  He established a dwelling in your heart, and he doesn’t want to leave.  To show us how much he cares and does for us and our homes God has some very practical things to say for his people about family life.  There are really three groups he addresses: the married, the children, and the parents.

First, when God thinks about a family, he wants a wife and a husband.  That might sound totally obvious, but when we live in a country where more than half of the marriages end in divorce, where many couples don’t even value the bonds of marriage, and where the very definition of marriage is being rewritten, we can’t just skip over that point.

Marriage is a lifelong commitment based in love that one man and one woman make to each other before God following the laws of the land.  It is the fabric of society and the foundation of a Christian home.  When God brings a man and woman together in marriage it is beautiful, and God wants to keep it that way.

Jesus said in the Gospel, “A man will leave his father and mother and be united to his wife, and they will become one flesh. So they are no longer two, but one. Therefore what God has joined together, let man not separate.”   God doesn’t encourage divorce or like it, because it not only ends a marriage but it fractures his foundation for a Christian home. Only when the other spouse makes it absolutely clear that they have broken their side of the commitment does Jesus permit divorce. The only evidence Jesus gives is sexual unfaithfulness, and God adds willful abandonment as part of that.

To keep a marriage going God’s way, then, it cannot be based on earthly things.  Sure, it’s a blessing to have a spouse who is fun, smart, passionate, prosperous, genuine, trustworthy, beautiful, and hardworking.  But those are not the main reasons to get married.  What if some of those things change?  What if time, stress, children, or an accident makes it hard to keep those traits going?  Would that mean it was time to break the marriage?  No!

No, a marriage cannot be based on what someone else gives or does for you.  The primary earthly reason for marriage is your love for the spouse.  It’s about what you give and what you do.  It’s not about how your spouse makes you feel but about your commitment to them.  And the only place to learn this kind of love is from the God who showed us what love is and what love does.  A Christian home will be built on God’s Word and the love of God that is shared between a husband and a wife.

The Word of Christ tells us, “wives, submit yourselves to your husbands, as is fitting in the Lord.   Husbands, love your wives and do not be harsh with them.”  Wives, you are not slaves submitting to an oppressive master.  You are God’s perfect and necessary complement for your man.  Your submission to your husband shows you follow his leadership and support him with care and compromise. Husbands, we are not the dictators. We are the example of Christ in the home, willing to give up everything for the glory of God and the benefit of the family.

Maintaining a Christian home will be difficult when this Word of Christ is not dwelling there.  If a relationship other than the marriage union that God established, if a marriage is based on something other than loving sacrifice and submission, then maintaining a Christian home will be difficult because you are not following the Word of Christ.  And when you don’t follow the word of Christ, then how can he be dwelling in your home?  He is being treated like a sporadic guest.

The next part of the home God mentions is children.  “Children, obey your parents in everything, for this pleases the Lord.”  You won’t find God saying that children deserve a bunch of their favorite things.  You won’t find God saying that children can complain and groan if they don’t get what they want.  You won’t find God saying that children should focus first and foremost on sports or school or hobbies.  You will hear God say that it goes well in a home if children honor and respect their parents as God’s representatives.  You will hear God say that children should look to obey their parents more than looking for their parents to provide for them.  You will hear God say the children who listen to the Word of Christ are a huge blessing for a Christian home.

And that leads to the third category, parents. “Fathers, do not embitter your children, or they will become discouraged.”  Often in a marriage, God will give the blessing of children.  It’s a privilege and responsibility.  It takes love, patience, wisdom, hard work, discipline to be a parent.  It takes a husband and a wife to give children the proper foundation for life.  It takes the word of Christ and the proper roles for the husband and wife to provide a Christian home for God’s blessing of children.

Sure, parents can give their children a nice upbringing without Jesus, but those children will be molded to think that life is about this world and my place in it.  They will grow up working hard and being good citizens to make a good life for themselves, but that’s all it will be.  And “how sad and poor and dark” is a place where Christ and the eternal joy he provides is not there.  So our primary goal is to let the Word of Christ dwell in the home. Our primary goal is to give glory to Jesus by trusting him and doing our best to live for him. If that is our primary goal, God promises that he will take care of everything else.

There are two reasons why Jesus cares so much about the home.  First, the family is the main way Jesus provides for us.  A father who is missing physically, emotionally, spiritually, a strained relationship between the father and mother, a lack of proper discipline, attraction/addiction to worldly pleasures, some kind of abuse –  when there is any kind of dysfunction in the family, it hurts.  It hurts the marriage, the parenting, and the children.

The second reason Jesus is concerned with the home is that God intended the family to be an illustration of his relationship with us. God wants a parent’s attitude and actions toward their children to be a picture of his own toward us. God wants a husband’s relationship with his wife to be a picture of his Son’s relationship with believers. If we don’t learn these examples at home, what are the odds that we will learn elsewhere? God could still make it happen, but the home was designed by God for that purpose.  If you don’t see God’s forgiveness play out at home between husband and wife, parents and child, a brother and sister, then where else can you see it? How are we going to see God’s Word in action if we have no model for it in the home?

That’s why Christ wants to dwell in your homes. But guess what, friends? Even if you grew up in or have a home that is a complete failure, it is still possible to learn and practice love and forgiveness and patience and discipline, because we will always have God’s household as a model. We will always have the relationship between God the Father and God the Son.  We will always have the relationship between Christ and his believers.

Paul doesn’t say, “Husbands, love your wives, just like your father loved your mother.” No, he says, “Husbands, love your wives, just as Christ loved the Church and gave himself up for her to make her holy, cleansing her by the washing with water through the Word, and to present her to himself as a radiant Church, without stain or wrinkle or any other blemish, but holy and blameless.”  That is why Paul doesn’t say, “Forgive each other as your parents forgave each other and as you and your siblings forgave each other.” What an inconsistent and sinful model that would be! No, he says, “Forgive as the Lord forgave you.”

Remember how Paul started this whole section?  You are God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved.  Christ doesn’t visit you, he dwells with you and lives in your heart through faith.  God brings you into his heavenly family so that you can live like his children here in your own family.  So be God’s children in your marriage, your parenting, your family roles, your obedience, and your life.  To God be the glory.  Amen.

WHAT IS LIFE LIKE IN THE EASTER VICTORY PARADE?

5.21.17 Easter 6A

Easter Season A

1 John 3:11-18

11 For this is the message you heard from the beginning: We should love one another. 12 Do not be like Cain, who belonged to the evil one and murdered his brother. And why did he murder him? Because his own actions were evil and his brother’s were righteous. 13 Do not be surprised, my brothers and sisters, if the world hates you. 14 We know that we have passed from death to life, because we love each other. Anyone who does not love remains in death. 15 Anyone who hates a brother or sister is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life residing in him.
16 This is how we know what love is: Jesus Christ laid down his life for us. And we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers and sisters. 17 If anyone has material possessions and sees a brother or sister in need but has no pity on them, how can the love of God be in that person? 18 Dear children, let us not love with words or speech but with actions and in truth.

 

The victory parade of Jesus defeating death still continues.  Whatever happened to you this week or last, whatever health trouble, work trouble, relationship trouble, financial trouble, or emotional trouble you have been dealing with does not diminish the truth of the gospel, that good news that says Jesus saves you.  No matter what has been ailing you spiritually, physically, or emotionally, you have a God who loves you to the point where he would let himself be arrested, tortured, and murdered so that you would not have to face the punishment for your sins.  And this God conquered death so that you get to talk about heaven as your very real, very certain, very perfect, very eternal home.  That is God’s love for you.

Let that sink in… God loves me to death, literally to hell, and then back again.  You know, that really works for me. I like that a lot.  Nothing can separate God’s love from me.  With my sin, I put unnecessary and unhelpful distance between God and myself.  I might ignore him at times.  I do things I shouldn’t, but God will still love me and want me to live with him forever.  He will still work through his Word to call me, to shatter my stony heart, to waken me from slumber, to turn my darkness to light.  He will still be the God who died for me and rose again.

Do you know what that’s called?  When someone does not base their love for me on my performance but loves me simply because they want to, that’s called grace.  And with God’s grace there’s no fine print.  There’s no obligations.  There is nothing that can change that kind of love called grace, because it’s not about me and who I am and what I do, it’s about God and who he is and what he does.

Like I said, that works for me.  God has a personal knowledge of me.  He has a personal way of dealing with me.  I’m not just a name on a long list.  I’m not just a number.  As Luther put it, “God has called me by the gospel, enlightened me with his gifts.  Sanctified and kept me in the one true faith.”   That’s a good thing for me to cherish when I feel weary and burdened.  That’s a good thing for me to hold onto when I feel alone.

But sometimes I’m selfish and I take it too far.  You do, too. I like that God knows me and loves me, but I can put too much attention on me.  I like that God is on my side, and in this self-obsessed, ego-infatuated, me-myself-and-I world, I put the focus on this relationship between God and me, failing to enjoy the fact that God has this kind of relationship with others, too.

“This is how we know what love is: Jesus Christ laid down his life for us.”  That’s a key word at the end.  Yes, I have a personal relationship with my Savior.  He brought me to faith and I now stand with him and will live with him forever.  But it’s not just me and him.  That pronoun is a first person pronoun, but’s it’s plural.  It’s “us!” That means Jesus loves more than me.

For the selfish heart that stubbornly says, “My faith is between me and God,” the fact is faith in Jesus connects us into a family.  Did you catch that in this letter John wrote.   John says “brothers and sisters” and “dear children.”  God’s grace called us by the gospel of Jesus Christ into his family.  That means there are others.  And these others are not foreign or strange.  They are family.  They were bought with the same blood of Christ.  They were baptized into the name of the same Triune God.  They were called, enlightened, and sanctified by the same Spirit.  They are built on the same solid foundation of God’s truth.  These fellow believers enjoy the same message of law and gospel.  They have the same eternal home waiting for them.  That lasts a lot longer than the family relationships we have on earth.

How does this family operate?  Is it a smile and a nod once in a while at church?  Is that how family works?  Is it nice words?  Some small talk with coffee and doughnuts?  A congratulations at a baptism?  A birthday greeting on facebook?  That just doesn’t sound like the way a family works, does it?

John says, “we should love one another.”  What exactly is the definition of love John is using?  Is it attraction, like a teenager trying to get a date for prom?  Is it a positive feelings for someone, like waving to your neighbors across the street?  Is it familiarity from spending a lot of time together, like a son mimicking his father?  Is that what love is?  That is not even close to the way God is using it here.

“This is how we know what love is: Jesus Christ laid down his life for us.”  That’s how God loves people.  He shows his love in actions.  He shows love by doing such amazing things for people who do not deserve it.  He sacrifices himself.  That is love.  That is the love that exists in the family of God, as John continues, And we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers and sisters.” 

Love is being willing to lay aside your preferences, your opinions, your goals, your time, your energy, even your whole being for someone else.  Love is not just saying they matter more, but showing it.  And this section is not addressed to spouses – although it certainly applies – it is addressed to those within the family of God.

But families don’t always get along, do they?  They don’t always have this kind of love.  In fact, in a family it can get downright nasty.  Did you hear that example of Cain and Abel?  Cain didn’t have the right attitude toward God or toward his brother.  Maybe he thought he could keep it hidden from Abel.  But God saw it all clearly.

God still sees it clearly.  He sees when it’s not just a busy schedule that separates his people, but careless selfishness.  He sees when it’s just the lips moving and the heart is ice cold.  What is happening to God’s family, when brothers and sisters cannot love one another with joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, gentleness, faithfulness, and self-control?  We are just like Cain.  We are self-obsessed.  We are ignorant and arrogant.  We are killing love.

Do you know what that is called when you kill love with hatred, with jealousy, with slander, with gossip… It’s called murder.  And if there is one thing this world loves, it’s hate.  Hatred toward people who lean politically.  Hatred toward people of different creeds.  Hatred toward different races and ethnicities.  It’s killing us.  It’s killing our world and it works its way among even God’s people.

And so into our world of hate, the love of God pierced the darkness.  It began with a promise to Cain’s parents, that hatred would not cut God off from his people, but God would put the hatred between his people and Satan (enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers).  The love of God shined brightly the night Jesus entered our world.  Angels sang of peace between God and men.  The love of God walked the earth, willing to show kindness and goodness to all, even the enemies who hated him.  The love of God allowed those enemies to kill Jesus, so that we would know what God’s love does for us.  But the love of God did not end in death.  Jesus passed from death to life.  He would not let hate ruin his kingdom.  With love, his death brought forgiveness and peace.  He would not let his people be ruled by evil and sin.  With love, Jesus destroyed sin, death, and hell.

I have a new life in Christ and so do you.  We have this life where there is peace with God and each other, a life where Christ lives in us through faith, a life where hatred does not control us, a life where I look for ways to show the love of God to my brothers and sisters the way God showed his love to me.

There is a world of people just like Cain, who cannot understand this sort of thing.  It’s foreign, nonsense. They don’t know Christ or care about him so how can they have his love in their hearts?  Instead, they serve themselves.  They hate any opposing view that does not fit their own.

Brothers and sisters, that is not us.  We are not ruled by what we hate.  We are ruled by the love of God.  We are so saturated with it, that we cannot possibly keep it in.  God’s love will never just be a me and God thing.  It will always be a God and us thing.  It will always be giving up what I want because God gave himself up for me.  I will put the needs of others first.

This love that flows from God through us will be visible.  It will be visible in this family of believers here.  It will be visible like good fruit is visible on a tree.  People will see your joy that exists not because everything in life is going smoothly, but because sins are forgiven and life in heaven is yours.  People will see your kindness, that isn’t looking for a reward but desires to help others in need.  People will see your faithfulness, that even though we live in fickle times, the risen Lord keeps us steadfast.  These brothers and sisters will see it and rejoice that God’s love can do such things.

That’s gospel ministry.  That’s the life we have in this victory parade.  Love is what defines us, God’s undying love that called us out of the darkness of hate and brought us into the light of life.  As Christ has love you, now you love one another. God grant it.  Amen.

THE COMEBACK FOR THE AGES

4.16.17 Easter Sunday

Easter 2017 2

Matthew 28:1-10

1 After the Sabbath, at dawn on the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to look at the tomb.
2 There was a violent earthquake, for an angel of the Lord came down from heaven and, going to the tomb, rolled back the stone and sat on it. 3 His appearance was like lightning, and his clothes were white as snow. 4 The guards were so afraid of him that they shook and became like dead men.
5 The angel said to the women, “Do not be afraid, for I know that you are looking for Jesus, who was crucified. 6 He is not here; he has risen, just as he said. Come and see the place where he lay. 7 Then go quickly and tell his disciples: ‘He has risen from the dead and is going ahead of you into Galilee. There you will see him.’ Now I have told you.”
8 So the women hurried away from the tomb, afraid yet filled with joy, and ran to tell his disciples. 9 Suddenly Jesus met them. “Greetings,” he said. They came to him, clasped his feet and worshiped him. 10 Then Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid. Go and tell my brothers to go to Galilee; there they will see me.”

 

They were down, big.  It really wasn’t even a game.  I literally left the party after halftime because it just wasn’t entertaining anymore (plus it was getting late for my kids, but it was mostly because of how boring the game was).  The score was 28-3 midway through the third quarter.  There had never been a comeback from that deficit in this big of a game. You might remember that day, this past February 5. It was Super Bowl LI, the Atlanta Falcons vs. the New England Patriots.  Now, I’m not at all a Patriots or Falcons fan, so I wasn’t broken up or pumped about it.  I was just kind of hoping for a good game.  But what about the Patriots fans that night?  The game was more than half over and the Patriots looked like they had forgotten what football was and how to play it.

Now, we’ve all been there before like the Patriots and their fans.  We’ve really hoped for one result and got something devastatingly different.  I know some people who were experiencing that kind of pain.  Men who had been so excited about the prospects of what could happen, like Patriots fans in the weeks leading up to yet another Super Bowl, but it all vanished.  They had that stunned look that you see so often from fans of a losing team in a championship game.  (Somewhat how I felt when I shaved my beard yesterday.)  It is just blank, void of energy, void of hope; it looks like there is no tomorrow, no next time.

The disciples were in those dark doldrums, but this wasn’t about a game.  There was no “can we start this over again.”  In fact, it was even worse than Patriots’ fans felt, because even when your team loses there will be another season.  The disciples were dealing with something much worse, something that couldn’t be undone.  Jesus was dead.  After all that time following him, listening to him, believing in himas God’s Son, it was all over.  They didn’t know what to do.  They were afraid.  They were together but felt so alone.  They were completely defeated.  They didn’t even go with the women to the tomb for closure.  It was too raw.  It hurt too much.

Do you know what that’s like?  I’m not just talking about seeing your favorite team getting the beat down.  I’m talking about when life is giving you the beat down.  Your spouse doesn’t seem so close lately.  Your house needs some work, but you’re too busy with work and money is tight.  Then, when you really didn’t need anything else added to your plate, you get rear-ended and the dentist calls saying it’s time for the family’s checkups (and who likes the dentist?). All those kinds of things that pile up and put you into a bad mood can be hard to handle.  They can seem overwhelming.   But somehow you manage.  After all, it’s not a life and death matter.

But then, that happens, too, like Jesus’ followers found out.  Maybe you know someone who has to deal with stage 4 cancer.  Maybe you have a good friend or coworker who was in a bad accident.  Maybe this past year or two you had to say goodbye to mom or dad, grandpa or grandma. That’s a lot worse than your favorite team getting the beat down or life giving you a few twists and turns.  That is life and death.  What do you do then?

And you know that you have to deal with it.  We have to come to grips with the fact that death is not optional.  Because in this world, nothing lasts forever, you and me included. So, what do we do about it?  Are we each supposed to find our favorite coping mechanism?  Some wrap themselves up in fun and family.  Some choose exercise and sports.  Some take to volunteering a lot.  Some try to ignore it all and live for the moment.  Some, sadly, turn to drugs or alcohol to numb the pain but it only causes more.  Is that what we are supposed to do?  But where does any of that get you?  Nothing we try can get rid of the fact that death will come.

The women on the way to the tomb were right in the middle of that sad reality.  It was dark and dismal for them.  The disciples were in it as well; too scared to go with them, too overcome with guilt that the last time Jesus saw most of them was as they were running away from him in fear.  Defeat has a way of sapping the life out of you, doesn’t it?

I’m sure that’s what Patriots fans were feeling.  And I know that players always say things like, “You just have to keep playing and see what happens,” but I’m sure there were plenty of guys on that sideline who weren’t thrilled with their play.  But then a little light started to peak through the clouds of defeat about halfway through the third quarter, it looked like the Patriots came out of the fog and remembered how to play for a championship.  They scored a touchdown, forced a punt, got a field goal, forced a fumble, got another touchdown.  It got to be a pretty serious game again with 3 minutes left.  The Falcons thought they had the defeated wrapped up, but the Patriots were showing a little life.

When the women arrived at the tomb, there was a little flicker of light.  They went out looking for Jesus’ dead body with a whole lot of disappointment, but when they got there, the guards didn’t meet them.  The large stone wasn’t standing in their way, and an angel was sitting there.  The angel said to the women, “Do not be afraid, for I know that you are looking for Jesus, who was crucified.”  The women were defeated as they came looking for Jesus’ dead body.  But the angel lifted their heads and hearts and pointed them to a place where defeat and death should have held Jesus, but it was looking like there was life now.  If Jesus was not there in that place of death, that meant there was still hope.  If Jesus had come back from the dead, that meant death doesn’t have to be the winner.  If Jesus was alive, it meant that he was telling the truth all along, he was God’s Son, the Savior from sin and death.

You know how the Super Bowl ended, right?  Spoiler alert: The Patroits won in overtime.  It was the greatest comeback in the Super Bowl, ever.  That was just one game for one trophy.

The angel said to the women, “He is not here; he has risen.”  Jesus didn’t just win a game or a trophy.  Jesus accomplished the comeback for the ages, for all ages, of all time.  He came back from the grave to win the greatest victory there is.  He conquered death.  CIR HIRI

He had gone to the cross to do battle against our sin.  It was brutal and agonizing. And it looked like he was gone for good.  But with his dying cry of “It is finished” he made a promise that came true when he rose from the dead.  Sin was paid for in full.  For all the times we try to fix our lives and fail, for all the times we turn our back on God to go our own way, only to realize our own way doesn’t remove the curse of sin and death, and for all the times we give up, Jesus had the greatest comeback.  The finality of death is gone.   Death now holds now power over us.  Jesus pulled off the upset.  CIR HIRI

Now, if there’s a winner, there has to be a loser, right?  That’s how it works, as much as youth sports might be teaching kids to try their best and have fun, every game has a winner and a loser.  The Patriots had a massive comeback victory.  That meant the Falcons had a catastrophic collapse.

On Easter, there were huge losers.   The disciples were totally defeated.  They had turned their backs on Jesus.  They ran away and left him to be beaten and killed.  They didn’t deserve anything.  They were losers.

Maybe there are times when you feel like a loser.  You have turned your back on God.  You have failed your family.  You’ve broken a promise.  You’ve made a mistake.  Ok, if you’re anything like me, then it’s a ton of mistakes.  Something really important happens on Easter.

Jesus suddenly appears to the women.  They ran right into the proof that Jesus was alive.  They fell down in worship.  (That’s pretty much the same thing we are doing today, and every Sunday, we worship the one who came back from the dead for us.)  They didn’t have doubts or disappointments anymore. CIR HIRI

Here’s what Jesus said to the women: “Do not be afraid.  Go and tell my brothers…”  Jesus calls the disciples “my brothers.”  That might not seem like a big deal, but this is the first time in Jesus’ life that he calls the disciples brothers.  They didn’t even deserve to be called disciples.  They were losers, but the risen Lord sends them a message: “go and tell my brothers.”  The comeback King, Jesus, said to sinners like that, “go and tell my brothers.”

They were not the losers on Easter, and neither are you.  Jesus came back to life because he wants you to have his victory.  That’s the kind of God we have.  We have a God who fights for us and wins for us.  We are free from our sins through Christ.  He promises that he doesn’t even remember your sins anymore because he paid for them all. Jesus is telling you when he calls the disciples “my brothers” that you aren’t losers.  You have his comeback victory for the ages.

But there has to be a loser.  Do you know who that is?  The loser is death.  The angel and, more importantly, Jesus say to you this day, “Do not be afraid.” Death is defeated by a Savior who came back to life.  There’s more losers, too. The devil, he thought he had a great victory just a couples days before.  God’s Son was supposed to save the world, but he couldn’t save himself.  But early Sunday morning there was a message waiting for him.  Jesus told the devil, “I’m back; you lose.”  The devil can try but he can never convince you that you are a loser.  Because when you believe that Jesus rose, you are on his side, the champion’s side.  The loser is also hell.  The loser is sin and evil and anything that tries to rob you of the joy Christ has won for you.  Easter is Jesus’ comeback for the ages.  He defeated all your enemies and all your fears so that you can live in constant victory.

My friends, without Jesus Christ and his comeback, we would live as losers.  We would be forced to think that this life is everything, this hard, kind of nice but often not so nice life is all there is.  You live, you die; end of story.  And if that were the case, then the devil wins, death wins, sin wins, hell wins.  All hopes, all dreams, all lives would be lost.  Before Easter, no one had made that impossible comeback to conquer death for all time.  Even those who were raised to life again by God’s power before this had to die again.  But not Jesus.  Jesus has the comeback victory.  And that changes everything in our lives.  We are not losers when we are on Jesus’ side.  He said, “I am the resurrection and the life, whoever believes in me will live even though he dies.”

Do you see how that makes you the winner? Not even death can rob us of God’s love through Christ.  We have peace. We have joy.  We have excitement, as if life is a constant victory parade on the way home to heaven, a home that was paid for with Jesus blood and assured when he came back from the dead.  Death means we can go home to a Father who will welcome us with open arms to an eternity with him.

I kind of feel bad for the Falcons and their fans.  That was a rough loss.  But there’s always next year.  I don’t feel bad for death.  I don’t feel bad that Jesus completely and totally destroyed it’s power forever.  I don’t feel bad that there is no next year for the devil.  Because I have a Savior who lives, and so do you.  That is the joy we have today and always because of Jesus’ comeback for the ages.

Christ is risen. HE IS RISEN INDEED.  Alleluia!!!!  Amen.