TAKING CARE OF BUSINESS

 

Light in the Darkness

Luke 2:41-52

41 Every year Jesus’ parents went to Jerusalem for the Festival of the Passover. 42 When he was twelve years old, they went up to the festival, according to the custom. 43 After the festival was over, while his parents were returning home, the boy Jesus stayed behind in Jerusalem, but they were unaware of it. 44 Thinking he was in their company, they traveled on for a day. Then they began looking for him among their relatives and friends. 45 When they did not find him, they went back to Jerusalem to look for him. 46 After three days they found him in the temple courts, sitting among the teachers, listening to them and asking them questions. 47 Everyone who heard him was amazed at his understanding and his answers. 48 When his parents saw him, they were astonished. His mother said to him, “Son, why have you treated us like this? Your father and I have been anxiously searching for you.”
49 “Why were you searching for me?” he asked. “Didn’t you know I had to be in my Father’s house?” d 50 But they did not understand what he was saying to them.
51 Then he went down to Nazareth with them and was obedient to them. But his mother treasured all these things in her heart. 52 And Jesus grew in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and man.

 

During the Christmas season, there are times when you have to say, “You don’t need to know.”  You come home from a trip to the store with some bags and of course the kids notice and ask, “What’s in the bags?  Anything for me?” “You don’t need to know.”  A spouse opens up a gift that seems pretty expensive and blurts out with a bewildered excitement, “How much did this cost?”  “You don’t need to know.”  Some family members who said they weren’t going to make it for a visit during the Christmas season show up unexpectedly, and you say, “What in the world are you doing here?  I thought you couldn’t make it this year.  How did you work this out?”  “You don’t need to know.”

There are also times when that seems to be the response from God.  Certain things in the Bible often raise questions for me.  Doesn’t that happen to you?  I want to know more about the circumstances, people, or a doctrine so that I can understand my life, the good and bad, better.  I want to know how to figure things out or what to tell people who are bothered by questions or problems they are having, but it seems like God is content to say, “You don’t need to know” to some of the questions we might have.

Can you understand why that is the case?  I’m not God and I cannot begin to understand everything he does or everything he knows.  How could I understand all the bad things happen in this world, to those close to me, to me?

There are some examples in Scripture of some who wanted answers and thought they deserved better from God.  And from what those sections describe, I don’t need detailed answers for every single bad thing that I see on the news or experience in my life.  I need the simple, straightforward, universal answers. I need to be reminded that I’m not God.  I’m not the one who is in control of all things.  If there are problems and pain all I need to know is that the cause is a world that is dark with sin.  Sin is at the root of every single bad thing that happens.  And sin is not God’s fault, it’s mine, yours…ours.

And if I want to find the answer, the solution to sin, there’s only one simple, straightforward, universal answer for that.  It’s Jesus.  That little baby of Bethlehem wasn’t born so that we could have an entire category of music that takes over the radios from Thanksgiving to New Years.  The eternal Word did not take on human flesh so that we could have a time of year to be off from school, get together with family, share some memories and eat way too much.  The Son of God who came from heaven down to earth did not take up residence here only for us to have a brilliant and inspirational life coach.  Or any of that other stuff that people want Jesus to be.

He came here to be the one answer for our sin.  He came here to destroy the devil’s work.  He came here to make peace for sinners and his Father.  He came here to open the gates of heaven.  He came here so that we could have good news that no one can take away from us.  He came to bring us out of our own darkness so that we could live in the light and also shine with his light for others.

How’s that for keeping things simple, straightforward, and universal?  Every page of Scripture is an answer to what is wrong with me and this world: it’s sin.  It’s the darkness we make by doing what God forbids and not doing what he commands.  And every page of Scripture is an answer to what takes the darkness of sin away: it’s Jesus.  He’s the light that dawned on Christmas and has been shinning brightly through the Word ever since.

But then we arrive at this sixth day of Christmas, and those questions start coming back again.   If the entire Bible is written by God and given to point people to our Savior, then why don’t we have more about Jesus from 0-30 years-old?  What was it like to teach baby Jesus to walk, to talk, to eat solid food, to potty train?  What was his first day of school like?  Did he always get straight A’s?  What was it like to be friends with the Son of God?  What did it look like for a perfect Jesus to make it through the tumultuous teenage years?  Did his voice ever crack?  Did he play an instrument or sing in the choir at synagogue?  What was his favorite sport?  Did he hit a home run every time he batted?  It’s astonishing how little information we have about the upbringing and growth of Jesus, isn’t it?

Wouldn’t this time period of Jesus’ life help struggling parents what to do with their kids?  Wouldn’t this part of Jesus’ life help struggling kids how to have respect and obedience for their parents?  Wouldn’t this time of Jesus’ life be helpful for a lot of things?  Why not more?  All we have is a very brief mention of Jesus at 8 days old being circumcised, Jesus at the temple when he was 40 days old meeting Simeon and Anna,  Jesus as maybe a 6 to 20 month-old kid when the Magi come for a visit (more on that next week), and then this section in front of us today when he is 12.

God is content to say, “You don’t need to know.”  And the reason why we only need these few events and details of Jesus childhood is because of what Jesus was here to do.  Jesus was not here to write a book for struggling parents or children.  Jesus was not here to come up with a teenager’s guide to high school.  There are some sections of the Bible that can help people in all sorts of circumstances, but the main thing is to know who Jesus is and what he does for us.

That’s why this section of God’s Word that gives us such a brief glimpse of Jesus tells us everything we need to know: Jesus was taking care of business, every day and his Father’s way.

We hear that Jesus’ parents went to Jerusalem for the Festival of the Passover every year.  And that’s exactly what we need Jesus to do for us.  He needs to keep the law that God gave in the Old Testament 100% perfectly.  Those ceremonial laws for Jewish worship were given by God for the people of Israel, so that they would be a light to the dark nations around them, so that foreign people would notice that there is something different about Israel and their God.  The problem was that the people of Israel did not always follow these laws very well if at all.  And that leads to the other reason for all of these special worship and festival laws and customs. They were also given by God as a promise that the Messiah was coming to forgive, deliver, save, and restore people.

These two little verses that seem so insignificant tell us so much about Jesus’ childhood and his life as our Savior from sin, death, and hell.  Every day he was following God’s laws.  Every day he was obeying his parents without a single sideways glance or disrespectful grunt.  Every day he was putting God first.  And he was doing that every day for all the 4, 5, 6, 12, 18, 24, 33, 42, 58, 67, and 92 year-olds who fail every day to obey God and those in authority, for those who fail to keep God as the number one priority, for those who fail to worship the Lord every week, for those who fail to keep God’s name holy, for those who fail to love their neighbor as themselves.  Every day Jesus was taking care of business, he was living as our perfect substitute who walked this world in our place so that some day we could walk in his place in heaven.

He was also taking care of this very important business his Father’s way.  When Mary and Joseph realize that Jesus is not with them, they react like every parent.  They search the big group of relatives and friends.  When that’s not successful, they take off for Jerusalem because this is worse than that Home Alone movie when the little boy, Kevin, is left all alone.  Kevin was in his house.  He knew the territory. He knew the neighborhood and the neighbors a little bit.  Jesus was in Jerusalem, not Nazareth where home was.  This is a huge city for a small-town kid.  I think we call understand the parents’ angst.

But the child was not lost.  He was not missing because of a conniving scheme to get away from mom and dad.  After three days they found him in the temple courts, sitting among the teachers, listening to them and asking them questions. Everyone who heard him was amazed at his understanding and his answers.  When his parents saw him, they were astonished. His mother said to him, “Son, why have you treated us like this? Your father and I have been anxiously searching for you.”  You can here a little bit of an irritated mother in Mary’s words.  She knows who she is talking to.  She’s seen him every day of his life as the perfect Son of God.  But this seems like a stretch to her.  Jesus had not done something actively against them, but these words still seem to show her shock and anxiety that her son could go three days without his parents.

But this is where God doesn’t want to keep us in the dark.  This is where we need to hear the child Jesus explain who he is.  Mary says, “Your father and I…”  to which Jesus responds, “Why were you searching for me? Didn’t you know I had to be in my Father’s house?”  Mary and Joseph are focused on their relationship to Jesus as his parents, his caretakers, his nurturers, his providers, but Jesus knows the whole time that his relationship to the Father in heaven is the priority.  It’s not that Mary and Joseph don’t matter.  Far from it.  But he knows why he’s here.  Jesus was here to take care of business his Father’s way.

Almost all the English translations say “my Father’s house,” but interestingly the Greek word for “house” is not in the text.  Literally, Jesus says, “Didn’t you know that it is necessary for me to be about my Father’s things.”  God’s business was that Jesus would fulfill all of the prophecies and laws for us. God’s business was to save the world through Jesus the Christ, his one and only Son.  God’s business was to put perfect Jesus in your place so that our sins would be removed from us and eternal righteousness would be put in their place.

And so that’s why Jesus gently, lovingly, and respectfully reminds Mary and Joseph whose he is.  He is God’s Son.  And in so doing he reminds them what his business is here in this world.   God lets us in on a little detail that Mary and Joseph don’t understand what he was saying to them.  It had to be difficult to raise the Savior, who doesn’t have the same life goals as normal children, but who also has to be a normal child to understand us and what we go through.

This is why Jesus quickly gets up and proceeds to go with them back to Nazareth.  Mary and Joseph are his earthly parents and there is a commandment about parents and authorities that we break far too often that Jesus needs to keep perfectly for us, because he is our Savior who is here to take care of the business of our salvation.

There are definitely times when we want to know more, we want God to let us in on some more information about the Bible, about our lives, about this world, about so many things.  But for all those times when God says “You don’t need to know” we have this beautiful section of Scripture recorded for us.  God says this is Jesus.  This is the one you need.  He is the one who took care of your business every day of his earthly life and just the way God needed him to do it so that we could be saved eternally.  I don’t know about you, but that’s more than enough for me to have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year for my entire life and for eternity.  Amen.

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IN THE BATTLE OF GOOD VS. EVIL, TEMPTATIONS HAVE MET THEIR MATCH

fields-of-battle-lent-a

Matthew 4:1-11

Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the desert to be tempted by the devil. 2 After fasting forty days and forty nights, he was hungry. 3 The tempter came to him and said, “If you are the Son of God, tell these stones to become bread.”
4 Jesus answered, “It is written: ‘Man does not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”
5 Then the devil took him to the holy city and had him stand on the highest point of the temple. 6 “If you are the Son of God,” he said, “throw yourself down. For it is written:

              “ ‘He will command his angels concerning you,
                   and they will lift you up in their hands,
                   so that you will not strike your foot against a stone.’”

7 Jesus answered him, “It is also written: ‘Do not put the Lord your God to the test.’”
8 Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their splendor. 9 “All this I will give you,” he said, “if you will bow down and worship me.”
10 Jesus said to him, “Away from me, Satan! For it is written: ‘Worship the Lord your God, and serve him only.’”
11 Then the devil left him, and angels came and attended him.

 

History is full of fights.  Now, some of these are better than others.  What I mean is Coyote vs. Road Runner is not necessarily as important as The United States of America vs. England in the Revolutionary War.  Ali vs. Frazier might be a favorite of a boxing historian and Olympic fans might recall 1980 USA vs USSR hockey – the Miracle on Ice – but those fights don’t carry as much influence as the Axis vs. Allies in two World Wars.  We could bring up so many more; history is full of battles.

In our Sunday worship series during Lent (the next 6 weeks), we will see the epic war of good versus evil play out on many different fields of battle.  This is the one fight that means the most for us.  Today, God’s Word takes us out in the desert where the devil takes aim at Jesus.

Jesus had just been begun his public ministry. Before this, Jesus had been living in Nazareth where he was known as the carpenter’s son. But the time had come.  John the Baptist had paved the way.  Jesus had been baptized in the Jordan where God had announced to the people just who Jesus was.  And then, the first thing Jesus had to do was face the devil for forty days in the desert.

I remember when my public ministry started back in August , 2011.  If my first job was to go mano y mano with Satan himself for the first month, I think it’s safe to say I wouldn’t be a pastor anymore.  But that’s where Jesus and I are different.  His job on earth was to face off against the devil every day.  He was here for battle, battle against our sin, battle against temptations, battle against our old evil foe. On top of that Jesus was God on earth.  If anyone could go toe to toe with the devil, it was Jesus.  But that didn’t make it easy for Jesus.  His fight wasn’t a walk in the park. Remember, he was God and also man.  Being on earth means that he gave up full use of his divine characteristics.  It meant he would face what we face.

The devil is cunning and crafty.  He knows how to bring the right kind of temptations at the right time.  When you are feeling healthy, comfortable and content the devil knows you aren’t desperate so he’s not going to tempt you with something simple like bread, although he can sure find ways to make even things look tempting when it isn’t needed, right?  But then there are times when we are starving spiritually, emotionally, even physically, and the devil knows what to do then, too.

That’s the first temptation we hear about in our lesson. “Hey Jesus, if you are the Son of God, you’re going to have to prove it.  Sure, the baptism was cool with the Holy Spirit as the dove and the heavens torn open with God’s voice of approval, but now you have to do something for me.  You’re hungry, so make these stones bread for yourself.” By the end of those 40 days, Jesus was hungry. Who wouldn’t be?  So notice how the devil made this temptation specific for Jesus at this specific time.  And it’s so reasonable: bread for a starving man.  What could be wrong with that?  But Jesus wasn’t sent here to do miracles for the devil.  The only reason Jesus did miracles was to help people and confirm his powerful saving message.  There was nothing he could do to help Satan.  Plus, Satan already knew who he was.  But that’s how he works; he’s tricky and opportunistic.

He knows how to do that against us, too.  He knows your weaknesses.  If your weakness is worry, then he’s going to find all sorts of things for you to fret about.  If your weakness is lust, there a plenty of tools at his disposal to stoke the fire.  If your weakness is anger, every day he will find something to ignite your temper. If your weakness is selfishness, he will find ways to make you feel more important than you actually are.  But these are not reasons to give in to him or to stop fighting against his temptations.  We can’t just say, “Well, it’s my weak spot, there’s nothing I can do about it.” Is that what faith in Jesus says? I just don’t think you’ll find anywhere in the Bible where God says, “Oh well, at least you tried.”

How about the second temptation? “Hey Jesus, I’m not sure about you. If you are God’s Son then God should keep his promises for you.  He’ll protect you against harm, right? Here’s a Bible passage to prove it. So jump, Jesus.  Take a leap of faith and let’s see what happens.”  In this fight, the devil knows your doubts and fears.  He will come convincing you that God doesn’t care about you, that he can’t seriously be listening to you all the time, that his power has a limit, or that he could never love someone like you.  The devil is even willing to twist Scripture.  He’ll question your footing on the rock-solid truth of God.  He’ll question everything God says to try to change your view.

Then there is the last temptation. “Hey Jesus, you are a powerful person.  You should have power here in this world. Bow down to me just once and I will make it happen.”  During our battles, the devil knows your desires, too.  He knows the things you want – even the good, God-pleasing desires.  The thought that Jesus should rule the world is not a bad thing.  Jesus had every right to rule the earth as King of kings.  He made the world, after all. There’s nothing wrong with Jesus ruling.  But to receive the throne by worshiping Satan?  No way!

Sin has a way of warping the good desires we have.  Yes, it is good to be happy.  Yes, it is good to be fulfilled and content.  Yes, you should enjoy this life that God has given you.  Those are good desires.  It’s just that sin and temptations want you to arrive there by taking the wrong route.  Happiness is not found in a bottle or in shopping mall.  You don’t find fulfillment by breaking your marriage vow. You can’t find contentment by filling your bank account.  And no matter what you think, this world is not a personal amusement park for you and your toys.

But that’s what Satan wants us to think. And to get us thinking this way, he makes promises that he cannot deliver. Because as soon as we give into sin – every time – we see how we have lost the fight against the devil.  We realize that he is lying.  The bottle doesn’t bring happiness, just the sad reality that you have found a new master for your life. Breaking your marriage vow doesn’t bring fulfillment but leads to empty hearts and empty homes.  A bursting bank account doesn’t bring contentment but creates more cravings that can never be satisfied.  Thinking that this world is a great place for me and my toys directs us away from the joys of heaven.

The devil makes these promises, and he cannot deliver them.  Did you notice how he does that to Jesus? He speaks as if he is the owner of all the kingdoms of the world? “All this I will give you, if you will bow down and worship me.”  No, that wasn’t true. And all too often, we find out that his half-truths are empty and destructive.

Satan is fighting hard against Jesus here, and he fights hard against every one of us.  I think we all realize that the battle we have against Satan often doesn’t happen the way it should. I’m not sure we always put up much of a fight against the devil and his temptations. Sadly, rather than fighting off temptations, we give in.  And we may even start to like some of them.

Today, I would love to give you a guidebook on how to get the devil out of your life.  I’d love to have a booklet that you can pick up after church giving you the 7 steps for fighting off temptations. But I don’t have that.  I don’t have a promise for you that if you just believe enough, pray enough, and do enough good you will be able to fight off all the devil’s temptations.  I don’t have a guidebook, a self-help manual, or an empty promise for you.

I have something better.  I have someONE better. He’s able to keep every commandment and fend off every temptation. He’s the one who came to fight our battles against sin.  He has the love and the power to save you.

There was a time when our perfect life and perfect relationship with God was lost because a man and his wife lost the battle against Satan.  They ate what the devil wanted them to eat.  But this time it was different.  Jesus didn’t give in.  He used the Word. “Man does not live on bread alone, but on every Word that comes from the mouth of God.” That was the first shot in the historic battle against the devil.  Jesus was here to change things.  He was not going to give in.  Jesus was here to rescue the lost and bring life to this place of death.

When the second temptation came, the devil tried to use God’s Word against him. Jesus said you can quote Scripture all you want, but you can’t change what it means or twist what God says.  Jesus made it known that he would follow God’s plan to the end and he would follow it perfectly.

When the third temptation came, Jesus knew that Satan was making an empty promise. Jesus was going to sit on the throne and rule all things, but it wouldn’t happen because of an unholy alliance with the devil.  He would take his rightful spot after he finished his work on the cross and rose triumphantly from the grave.  Jesus said, “It is written: ‘Worship the Lord your God and serve him only.’”  That is the place where a Christian has power and peace, in the Lord’s presence in his house.

These were the first shots that Jesus took in this historic battle to prove the devil wrong.  He came to do what we couldn’t do.  Jesus came to be what we couldn’t be.  And God says the Jesus did it all in our place.  The victory that Jesus won against the devil that day, God gives it to you.  You can fight all your temptations knowing the Jesus fought them for you.

But the war wasn’t over on that day.  There is more to come as we look at different fields of battle, but we know who is fighting.  Jesus Christ is God in flesh.  He is the Savior and substitute.  He is the one that the devil fears.

With that kind of Savior doesn’t that change the way you fight against temptations.  Knowing that your Savior fought that battle, doesn’t it help?  But he didn’t just fight that day in the desert, he won!  And it wasn’t just one battle that he fought, he fought them all, and he won!  All the times when the devil’s temptations took advantage of weaknesses, all the times when you doubted God’s power, all the times your desires were used against you – for all your sin, Jesus’ victory over the devil was given to you.

Today, we see Jesus at war against the devil and his temptations. We see the battle of good vs. evil, and temptations have met their match.  That’s not just true for Jesus.  It’s true for you.  Jesus went to war against the devil’s temptations as your perfect Savior.  Jesus went to war for your forgiveness. And he won!  He’s the strength and courage you need in your battles, and he’s always with you.

Amen.

 

DISCIPLESHIP TAKES A TOLL

warning

25 Large crowds were traveling with Jesus, and turning to them he said: 26 “If anyone comes to me and does not hate his father and mother, his wife and children, his brothers and sisters—yes, even his own life—he cannot be my disciple. 27 And anyone who does not carry his cross and follow me cannot be my disciple.
28 “Suppose one of you wants to build a tower. Will he not first sit down and estimate the cost to see if he has enough money to complete it? 29 For if he lays the foundation and is not able to finish it, everyone who sees it will ridicule him, 30 saying, ‘This fellow began to build and was not able to finish.’
31 “Or suppose a king is about to go to war against another king. Will he not first sit down and consider whether he is able with ten thousand men to oppose the one coming against him with twenty thousand? 32 If he is not able, he will send a delegation while the other is still a long way off and will ask for terms of peace. 33 In the same way, any of you who does not give up everything he has cannot be my disciple.

 

Tim Tebow’s in the news again.   It’s not because he’s praying in public. It’s not because he’s trying to make it in the NFL again. It’s because he wants to make it in baseball.  Yeah, you heard right.  The former Heisman Trophy winner, the former college football national champion, who couldn’t get the job done on Sundays is now all in for a different career.  He hasn’t played in a real baseball game since high school.  He’s hoping some team will give him a shot in the minors.  Most prospects and draft picks are 18, 19, maybe 23; Tim Tebow is 29.  Most ball players and scouts talk about the daily routine and grind. In the minors, that means buses, hotels, eating out, distance from family and friends. They talk about keeping your mechanics of a swing or a throw over the long hall.  If you want to be good you need to know how to handle these things.  Tim Tebow just picked up at bat and got serious this past May after 11 years off.  Most people think he’s in la-la-land. Some think he’s got a shot, but it’s a looooong shot.  It’s going to take unwavering determination and total dedication and devotion.  You could say it is going to really cost him if he wants to make it.

In this Warning series Jesus has been warning us of spiritual dangers.  These warnings help us and encourage us to be ready and alert in faith.  They help us the same way the long list of warnings are motivating Tim Tebow. Warning 1) His Word is not supposed to create a utopia here on earth.  His Word will cause some divisions and those divisions might hit close to home, but the truth will always set us free from sin and bring us the eternal peace and unity. Warning 2) The door to heaven is narrow.  There is only one way to heaven and his name is Jesus.  Believe it or leave it. Warning 3) Be humble in this life.  You can’t puff yourself up with pride because you have nothing to be proud about except Jesus.  His humility saved us so that is how we will be exalted on the Last Day.

Now today is the fourth warning and Jesus wants you to know the toll of discipleship.  Is it like Tim Tebow chasing a lofty dream?  Does it take unwavering determination and the highest effort?  Jesus wants to help us figure that out in this last warning in the series.

We hear that large crowds were following Jesus at this time. We’re still in this same timeframe of less than a year before makes his last entrance into Jerusalem.  And tons of people were interested in Jesus.  Many were following the great teacher and miracle worker.  Many others were intrigued by the popular and polarizing fanatic.  Some were following God’s Messiah, the Savior of the world.

Which category are you in?  Duh! Of course that third group!  I’d sure hope so.  Being in those first two groups doesn’t do much.  It would be like following a political candidate, an athlete, or some motivational religious speaker every day online.  What does that really do for your life, give you something to talk about when you’re out getting coffee?  Jesus wants us to know that following him like that is doing nothing for you.  It’s the same as if you weren’t following him at all.  He doesn’t want us in either one of those groups.

That’s why he turns to the crowds and says, “If anyone comes to me and does not hate his father and mother, his wife and children, his brothers and sisters—yes, even his own life—he cannot be my disciple.”  Wait a minute!  That doesn’t even sound Christian.  The Bible says love your enemies. How could a follower of Jesus do that?  Well, Jesus is using a hyperbole.  It’s a comparison to draw attention and prove his point that discipleship is not easy.  Jesus is telling us that nothing can compare to him.  The parents, who took care of you and nurtured you, the spouse, who is your supportive rock, the children, whose smiles, hugs, and laughter bring so much joy into your life… love Jesus more than all of them.  Jesus needs to be the first, the supreme, the most important – not just one day a week – every day of your life.

So, if your brother says, “I know God doesn’t approve of the way I live my life, but I’d like you to stop reminding me about it.”  The thought of not sharing God’s law and gospel with him makes your insides turn.  Your child says, “Daddy, Daddy, can I please play soccer. Pretty please.  My friends are playing and it’s going to be so much fun.”  But the league games are Sunday. The thought of sitting on the sidelines watching your kid on the soccer field rather than being in worship with your kid makes you nauseous.  Your spouse says, “I appreciate your willingness to serve and the gifts you are giving to church, but it’s getting a little bit much don’t you think?”  Your response as a disciple of Christ is, “I love you, dear.  I will do anything for you.  But if you ever ask me to choose between Jesus and you, you won’t like my answer.”  That’s how serious Jesus is.  “But my kids need me and my spouse is everything to me.  Jesus, you are right up there with them, but come on! It’s my family.  They are with me every day, all day.”  Jesus doesn’t say, “Well, ok.  You can be a second tier disciple.  You won’t be a Peter, James, or John, but you can still tag along.”  No!  He says, “If you don’t love me more – I’ll even say this very clearly with a metaphoric hyperbole, if you don’t hate them – you cannot be my disciple.  It’s my way or the highway.”

What group are you in?  Are you the follower of the miracle worker?  Jesus provides what you want sometimes and the rest is up to you.  Are you following Jesus like someone on Twitter or Facebook, like a political candidate or an athlete?  He’s popular and you want to know about him so that you can chat with your friends.  Or are you willing to put everyone in a lower position so that Jesus can be #1 all the time?

Discipleship is not easy.  It takes a toll.  The way Jesus sounds, it takes more to be his disciple than it does for Tim Tebow to make it as a baseball player. You need determination like you’ve never had before.  But Jesus isn’t done, yet.  He talks about how you think and feel towards others, but he also has something to say about how your life will be very personally affected. Can you handle this?   “And anyone who does not carry his cross and follow me cannot be my disciple.”

And what is this cross?  Do we have to carry a huge chunk of wood around with us wherever we go?  Is a cross some form of punishment because we are sinful?  No.  Simply speaking a cross is something that brings pain and hardship into your life of faith.  Think of Joseph or Job from the Old Testament. Think Paul in the New.  These men weren’t being punished.  They were being trained and tested. This cross is never the same for every disciple.  It’s heavier for some.  It’s last longer for some.  But the purpose of our crosses is to get the focus off of me and directed to Jesus, the only Savior from pain and suffering.

Normally, a cross was for those who deserved death.  Criminals were forced to carry the cross that would kill them.  But Jesus says that his disciple will carry it willingly.  It’s not optional.  This cross of pain and hardship that each disciple has must be carried. If you are not willing, one of those other groups will not work and you can’t slide down a scale of discipleship that is a little less serious.  Jesus simply says you are not his disciple.

Some may go along with the relationship thing.  Yes, we love Jesus above our family.  But when Jesus says that a disciple must face pain and struggle, must make some huge sacrifices… then people start to leave.  Because you can look around and see plenty of people that are not struggling.  You can find plenty of friends and families that are healthier, happier, and more successful.  And that sounds a lot better than being crushed under a heavy load.

And Jesus isn’t done; there’s one more thing.  Any of you who does not give up everything he has cannot be my disciple.  Whatever you have that gets in the way of following Jesus, wherever you look to find your worth, it has to be tossed aside, because it cannot compare to Jesus.

And this is not just a one-time thing.  Discipleship is never done.  For Tim Tebow, this newest journey won’t last, just like his college career ended and his NFL career ended, his baseball hopes will end.  But discipleship doesn’t have an end date during your life. Throughout this whole section Jesus is using the present tense.  That means whatever is current, right now in your life.  And that changes from year to year, even from day to day.  Before you had a spouse there was no need to lower that relationship beneath Jesus.  Before you had a career there was no need to put that in its proper place behind Jesus.  And so on.  Every day as a disciple is a day to put relationships in their proper place below Jesus.  Every day you have to take up the struggle.  Every day you have to give up whatever creeps up to take Jesus’ place.  It never ends.  You will never say, “I have carried my cross of sickness, sorrow, emotional pain, or persecutions and now I don’t have to do that anymore. I’m done with my cross.”  Jesus says if you are going to be his disciple, it never stops.  Every day there will be a toll.  Every day will be a battle.

Is it worth it?  That’s kind of the real question here.  Jesus uses two examples to explain that point.  A person wanting to build something great has to plan it out and consider all the costs and the sacrifices so that they can finish the project.  Someone who didn’t think it through and cannot finish the project is laughed at.  A king going to battle against another king considers if he can carry out his plan and come out victorious.  If he can then the battle ensues.  If he cannot he sends up the white flag and negotiates for peace.

A follower listening to Jesus say these kinds of things will inevitably ask, “Is it really worth it?”  I don’t know too many people who look over this section about discipleship and think to themselves, “Sounds great!  Sign me up!”  I mean this is tough.  This is not for the faint-hearted.  Discipleship with Jesus is not going to be easy, ever.  Who is up for this?

But there’s one final thing that jumps out of this section.  It’s not in the words, but you find it in the One speaking the words.  He’s known as Word made flesh, Jesus Christ.  Did you notice how every one of these things is exactly what Jesus has done?  In his earthly life he put his heavenly Father first all the time.  He carried his cross willingly.  He considered the high cost and still followed the plan to the T.  He left everything and everyone behind so that he would be the perfect Savior and substitute for us.

Just think, when he came down from heaven and was born in a barn, God was first.  As he submitted himself to his earthly parents, God was first.  When he was 12 in the temple, God was first.  As he began his ministry by being baptized by John, God was first.  Every day of his ministry carried out the will of God.  At one point Mary and his family showed up where Jesus was wanting to talk with him, but Jesus put God’s work first.  His love for God was always more than his love for his family.  That doesn’t mean he disowned his family or harbored ill will towards them at any time.

And then Jesus was willing to carry his cross.  He didn’t deserve that torture, but he carried it for us.  And when it came time to die, he didn’t back off but he went the whole way, even saying farewell to his earthly mother. Jesus didn’t let anything stop him.  He considered the high cost of your forgiveness. He saw the war with the devil, the world, and each of our sinful natures that only one could fight, and so Jesus went to war and won our victory.

Why did Jesus do it?  You were worth it to him. Jesus loved you and could not bear the thought of you flounder away thinking that your eternity, your salvation in heaven, was based on your discipleship.  It’s not.  Discipleship and salvation are two different things.  Never once in this section does Jesus say that discipleship will save you.  Discipleship can’t save you, because discipleship is all about your crosses and your sacrifices.  If your discipleship saved you then how would you ever know that you had done enough?  How would you ever know if the sacrifices you make would atone for all your sins?  You would go through this life with no peace and no joy.

But your salvation is no dependent on your crosses and your sacrifices.  Your salvation depends on Jesus’ cross and his sacrifice.  He does not let you down.  He didn’t skimp on anything for you.  He made every sacrifice.  He took the full weight of the cross.  He died for your sins and rose to prove that his work defeated all your enemies.  Jesus saves you.

No one can love you more than Christ Jesus. No one can love your spouse, your parents, and your kids more than Christ Jesus.  You know that’s true because as much as you care for them, you could never take away their sins.  You could never give them what Jesus has.

Jesus’ love, his willing sacrifice, is what changes the way we think of discipleship.  Instead of thinking that we have to make all sorts of unfair sacrifices in order to live with Jesus forever, we get to make these sacrifices so that we can understand his love for us more, so that we can have a deeper relationship with our eternal Savior, and so that we can love and serve those around us more.  We get to be disciples even though we could never live up to these requirements because Jesus met every one of them perfectly for us.

Doesn’t that make you want to live for him?  Doesn’t that make discipleship a joy and not a burden?  For Tim Tebow, his journey to the MLB is going to be grueling and it may not even pan out.  It’s going to take a heavy toll on his life.  It’s going to cost him.  And for what?  A few years of maybe making it to the big time and proving that he can hack it as a professional athlete.   But for him it’s worth it.  But you know, there’s something else about Tim Tebow.  He’s a follower of Jesus.  So, he understands that the biggest sacrifice was already made.  Jesus died for his sins….and yours and mine and the sins of the whole world.  He did that so you would never think that you have to earn his love by following him like this.  Jesus paid for you.  He washed you and purified you.  He made you God’s own child.  Now, he says, “Be my disciples.”  And no matter what the cost or the toll, it’s worth it for a Savior who loves you that much.

Amen.